How To Fiberize

We supply tips for how to add more fiber to daily meals. Yes, that frozen pizza and Hot Pockets can actually amp up nutrition in a big way with what we call "fiberizing"—adding high-fiber ingredients to everyday foods. After all, eating 25 grams of fiber each of Sunday through Saturday is absolutely vital to good health.

Fiber is a super nutrient, fills you up so you’re less likely to snack on empty calories, cleans out your digestive system, and has cancer and heart disease prevention benefits.

Keep High-Fiber Ingredients Handy

We suggest keeping the following high-fiber items on hand in the kitchen, so fiberizing is possible any day, any time. We’re not including fresh fruits and vegetables, because we’re focusing on ingredients that are easily stored for a longer period of time. Fresh produce can substitute for frozen in any of our suggestions.

In The Freezer

• Favorite frozen vegetables

• Favorite cooked vegetables (store in several, small sealable plastic bags)

• Favorite frozen fruits

• 100% whole wheat bread

• Whole wheat dinner rolls

• Whole wheat croutons (buy ready-made or make your own)

• Cooked whole wheat rotini pasta (store in several, small sealable plastic bags)

• Cooked barley (store in several, small sealable plastic bags)

• Cooked quinoa (store in several, small sealable plastic bags)

(Make sure you label and mark the date (when you put into the freezer) on items you freeze. Frozen fruits and vegetables already have an expiration date on the package. But foods that don’t come from the grocery store as frozen, such as the sealable plastic bag ingredients noted above, need to be marked. Items shouldn’t be stored longer than 3 months in the freezer. Once you defrost food from the freezer, it isn’t safe to re-freeze.)

In The Cupboards

• Beans in a can, such as: black, pinto, kidney, cannellini, garbanzo, refried

(rinse before use—except refried)

• Whole wheat crackers (or these can be stored in freezer for longer life)

• Dried fruits (such as cranberries, cherries and apricots)

• Nuts such as almonds, peanuts, soybean nuts, pistachios, walnuts

• Seeds such as pumpkin and sunflower

• High-fiber cereal (3 or more grams of fiber per serving)

• Pumpkin pie mix in a can

Now, Fiberize . . .

Frozen Pizza

• Add frozen vegetables to frozen pizza before it goes into the oven.

• Add thawed, cooked vegetables to pizza once it comes out of the oven.

• Add frozen pineapple to frozen pizza before it goes into the oven.

• Add thawed blueberries to pizza as it comes out of the oven.

• Add thawed strawberries to pizza as it comes out of the oven.

• Add beans to pizza once it comes out of the oven.

Note: If you start with a frozen pizza that has a whole wheat crust, you’re off on the right fiber foot!

Soup

• Add thawed, cooked vegetables to warmed soup.

• Cook frozen vegetables with the soup.

• Add thawed whole wheat rotini pasta to warmed soup.

• Add beans to warmed soup.

• Add thawed barley to warmed soup.

• Add thawed quinoa to warmed soup.

• Add thawed whole wheat croutons to warmed soup.

• Add whole wheat crackers to warmed soup (go ahead and crumble ‘em up!).

• Serve with a whole wheat dinner roll on the side.

Sandwiches

• Swap white bread slices for 100% whole wheat bread slices.

• Add just-thawed frozen or thawed, cooked vegetables to sandwiches.

• Add beans to sandwiches.

• Add thawed quinoa to sandwiches.

• Add dried fruits to sandwiches.

• Add nuts and seeds to sandwiches.

Salads & Cooked Veggies

• Add thawed fruits and dried fruits to salads and cooked veggies.

• Add just-thawed frozen and thawed, cooked vegetables to salads.

• Add nuts and seeds to salads and cooked veggies.

• Add thawed whole wheat rotini pasta to salads and cooked veggies.

• Add thawed barley to salads and cooked veggies.

• Add thawed quinoa to salads and cooked veggies.

• Add thawed whole wheat croutons to salads.

• Add whole wheat crackers to salads (go ahead and crumble ‘em up!).

Macaroni & Cheese and Ramen

• Add thawed, cooked vegetables to cooked mac & cheese or ramen.

• Cook frozen vegetables with the macaroni (drain, add cheese to all) or ramen.

• Add thawed whole wheat croutons to cooked mac & cheese or cooked ramen.

• Add whole wheat crackers to cooked mac & cheese or ramen (crumble and sprinkle on top).

Note: If you start with whole wheat macaroni for the mac & cheese, you’re off on the right fiber foot!

Scrambled Eggs

• Add thawed, cooked vegetables as you’re scrambling the eggs.

• Add thawed quinoa as you’re scrambling the eggs.

• Add beans as you’re scrambling the eggs.

Cereal

• Add thawed fruits and dried fruits to cereal.

• Add nuts and seeds to cereal.

• Add high-fiber cereal to cereal that isn’t so high in fiber.

Note: If you start with a high-fiber cereal, you’re off on the right fiber foot!

Yogurt

• Add thawed fruits and dried fruits to yogurt.

• Add nuts and seeds to yogurt.

• Add high-fiber cereal to yogurt.

• Add pumpkin pie mix to yogurt.

Apple Sauce

• Add thawed fruits and dried fruits to apple sauce.

• Add nuts and seeds to apple sauce.

• Add high-fiber cereal to apple sauce.

• Add pumpkin pie mix to apple sauce.

You Get the Fiberizing Idea, Right?

If you need more information or additional tips, please reach out at any time: hello@my25.com.

Shoot us a question. Anytime! We’ll get back to you pronto.

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